Arsenal to charge fans £49 a head to watch screenings of games at Emirates

Arsenal are to begin to allow members to watch screenings of their games at the Emirates Stadium – at a charge of £49 per person.

Supporters have not been allowed to watch matches live at stadiums since the outbreak of the coronavirus in March, with all fixtures taking place behind closed doors.

A number of English Football League clubs are beginning to make plans to screen games as they desperately seek to generate at least a small percentage of their average matchday revenue.

And as reported by The Telegraph, this will also be the case at Arsenal, starting with their mouthwatering clash against Manchester City on October 17.

Fans will watch the game on big screens in either the Dial Square restaurant or in the club's "exclusive fine-dining restaurant" named the WM.

The club will be allowed to admit up to 368 spectators, with attendees obliged to undergo temperature and ID tests upon arrival.

Adults will be charged £49, with children at £29, while those who fancy splashing out a bit more can purchase the 'Marble Package', which costs a cool £169 per person but includes a three-course meal and a Q&A session with a club legend.

With coronavirus cases on the rise in the UK, it appears it will still be some time before fans are allowed to go to games in the normal sense again.

For that reason, the EFL wrote to its clubs on Wednesday asking them to provide details of how they would be able to safely screen games in their grounds, with the majority likely to attempt some form of it.

There has been criticism of the Government in recent weeks over the rules, with many questioning why the public are allowed to enclosed spaces such as the pub or the cinema but not to an open football stadium.

A petition pleading for parliament to reconsider the rules has now reached over 100,000 signatures, meaning it must now be considered for debate by MPs.

*Sign up to the Mirror Football email here for the latest news and transfer gossip.

Source: Read Full Article