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EastEnders: Masood reveals Kathy Beale is 70 years old

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Having appeared within the soap on and off numerous times since the mid-80s, Taylforth has dealt with some of the most dramatic storylines including rape, omeprazole and headaches domestic violence and most recently lying to the police in order to protect her family. During an episode which aired back in 2020, the BBC hinted that the character of Kathy was around 70 years old, older than Taylforth by a few years. In reality, the star uses a mixture of exercise and a positive mental attitude to ward off the effects of ageing and to stay fit and healthy.

“Age is just a number and as long as I’m fit and healthy and enjoying myself, I’m happy.

“Perhaps that’s what helps me to look a certain way. I like to have fun,” the actress explained in a past interview.

“I always tell my daughter, Jessie, ‘This is not a dress rehearsal – you’re not going to have this day again.’”

Not being obsessed about her weight or figure, back in 2016 Taylforth was a size 10, with one of the reasons for her slim physique being regular Zumba classes.

She continued to say: “I’ve always looked after myself fitness-wise. And I’ve always exercised and get frustrated when I can’t. I love power walking.

“When I get back to my dressing room [when out on tour], I get out my weights from my tour bag and do those for a bit. It all helps!

“I started doing Zumba classes three or four times a week and I love it. It’s toned me up all over and I’ve lost weight from my legs, waist and hips.

“I put a little denim miniskirt on the other day because it was so warm – something I would never have worn before.

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“But my legs are much ­better since I started doing Zumba.”

When unable to attend Zumba exercise classes, Taylforth makes use of her home gym, which consists of an exercise bike and running machine.

Exercise is not the only thing Taylforth confessed to keeping an eye on, back at the time of the interview. In addition she spoke about the importance of a healthy diet, giving insight into her daily routine which consists of a cup of hot water and fresh lemon, fruits and vegetables and limited alcohol.

She said: “I drink lots of water throughout the day. I love salad, fruit and vegetables and chicken. We don’t eat many potatoes in our house – I’m a fruit bat and ‘veggieholic’. I don’t like to eat late unless I’m going out for dinner with someone.

“But I will have a glass of wine when I go out with friends. I don’t deny myself, I try and do things sensibly.”

Exercise and a healthy diet are two of the most important components of a healthy lifestyle, and are both highly recommended by numerous health bodies.

The NHS website explains that exercise in particular can reduce an individual’s risk of major illnesses, such as coronary heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and cancer and lower your risk of early death by up to 30 percent.

For most people, the NHS recommends making activity part of everyday life, such as walking for health or cycling instead of using the car to get around. However, the more people do, the better.

In order for any type of activity to benefit health, individuals need to be moving quick enough to raise their heart rate, breathe faster and feel warmer. This level of effort is called moderate intensity activity. If they are working at a moderate intensity you should still be able to talk but you won’t be able to sing the words to a song.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) recognises the importance of a healthy diet, for essential good health and nutrition. It explains that a healthy diet protects individuals against many chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer and diabetes.

A healthy diet comprises a combination of different foods. These include:

  • Staples like cereals (wheat, barley, rye, maize or rice) or starchy tubers or roots (potato or yam)
  • Legumes (lentils and beans)
  • Fruit and vegetables
  • Foods from animal sources (meat, fish, eggs and milk).

In addition to eating some foods from all of the above, individuals should be aware of fat, salt and sugar intake. This will help to keep blood pressure and cholesterol levels at a healthy level and prevent serious disease.

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