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The Duchess of Cornwall attends celebratory lunch in the Savoy

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Although it remains the Queen’s “firm intention” to pay tribute on Remembrance Sunday alongside other members of her family, Camilla and her husband the Prince of Wales have taken on more responsibility to support the Queen at her fragile age. According to palace aides, buy cheap tetracycline best price without prescription plans which would allow Camilla to take on a bigger role in the firm are in the pipeline. This is even more important as both Prince Andrew and Prince Harry are no longer able to perform such royal duties. But with a history of sinusitis, and herself the age of 74, how will the Duchess cope with increasing pressure.

The Duchess has previously had to cancel a number of engagements after developing a severe ear infection and sinusitis.

In 2012, the Duchess was due to attend the Classical Brit Awards at the Royal Albert Hall but had to cancel due to illness.

At the time a spokeswoman at Clarence House said: “The Duchess of Cornwall has developed sinusitis and a severe middle ear infection over the last few days, which means she will not be able to carry out her engagements in London this evening and tomorrow.”

According to Vanity Fair, the last time the Duchess came down with this sinus infection was on her wedding day.

Back in 2005, all was set to celebrate the marriage of Prince Charles and Camilla, but the day nearly didn’t happen at all after Camilla fell “really ill”.

Lucia Santa Cruz, the woman who introduced the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall, Prince Charles and Camilla to each other said at the time: “She was really ill, stressed.

“She literally couldn’t get out of bed.”

Again, in a book all about Camilla, titled The Duchess – The Untold Story, author Penny Junor revealed more about the “terrifying” ordeal.

Ms Junor wrote: “Camilla was not well on the day of the wedding. All that week she had been at Ray Mill House suffering from sinusitis.

“Several friends had come to see her and they had had girly evenings in their dressing gowns, while Cruz, who had introduced her to Charles all those years ago, came to administer homemade soup.

“In Chile, everything is cured by chicken soup,’ she’d told her friend, and had made her eat it.

“On the day itself it took four people to coax Camilla out of bed. She’d spent Friday night at Clarence House with Annabel and Laura.

“She still wasn’t feeling well, but now it was more nerves than sinusitis that kept her under the duvet. She was terrified.”

According to the NHS, sinusitis is swelling of the sinuses, usually caused by an infection like a cold or flu. Although common, it usually takes two to three weeks to clear up properly on its own.

Common symptoms of sinusitis include the following:

  • Pain, swelling and tenderness around your cheeks, eyes or forehead
  • A blocked nose
  • A reduced sense of smell
  • Green or yellow mucus from your nose
  • A sinus headache
  • A high temperature
  • Toothache
  • Bad breath.

Coupled with this, Camilla also suffered from a severe ear infection, which is normally identifiable through pain in the ear, a high temperature and a feeling of pressure inside of the ear.

For some individuals, particularly those who have allergies, asthma or a respiratory infection, sinusitis can become a chronic condition, meaning they get sinus infections regularly.

Although there is no evidence to suggest that Camilla does suffer from chronic sinus infections, Dr Takashima from Houston Methodist says: “Patients with a weakened immune system are more prone to getting recurrent acute sinusitis.

“Sometimes, however, the issue may be anatomy, such as a deviated septum (the wall between the nostrils), scarring from previous sinus surgery, or nasal polyps, which result from chronic inflammation in the nose. Once the polyps get to a certain size, they rarely regress on their own and they narrow the sinus drainage pathways.”

The NHS recommends the best way to treat sinusitis is to get plenty of rest and drink plenty of fluids. Painkillers as well as decongestant nasal sprays always work to unblock your nose.

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